Adonai, our Lord and Master

Now the Lord said to Abram, ‘Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you.’” Genesis 12:1 (ESV)

The above verse has had special meaning to my husband and me recently. We sensed the Lord’s call for us to sell our Houston home and move to a new town. We knew a little about our new home: that it was to be a rural property in Texas, and we were not to go into debt to purchase it.

Texas is a big state with a lot of rural property! We began our search for a house that met these qualities and had a sale price within our budget. We saw several homes that we liked, but since we didn’t have clear understanding of where we were to live, we looked at property in many parts of Texas. Just recently, the Lord has shown us where our new home is to be and directed us to a specific piece of property.

Genesis 12:1 is more than a verse we’ve remembered many times over the last several months. It is the first time the Hebrew word Adonai was used in the Bible as a name of God. Adonai is plural of Adon, which is mostly used to refer to men who are Master over their servants. The plural form of Adonai refers to God’s greatness as Master. The plural form could also refer to the Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit all are God our Master and Lord.

So what does it mean when we call God Lord or Master? Adonai speaks of relationship, but not just any relationship. It is used to describe our relationship with God as our Lord and Master. As Master, God is the one with the right of possession. As Master, He provides for us and protects us. He gives directions that we are to follow. He is our Supreme Lord, Owner of all, and we areHis servants. We are stewards who have been declared worthy to serve Him.

In the New Testament, Jesus is referred to as Lord over 700 times. The Greek equivalent to Adonai is Kurios. It signifies sovereign power, supreme authority, and absolute ownership. He is Lord and Master, we are servants and stewards of Christ.

1 Corinthians 4:1-2 says, “This is how one should regard us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Moreover, it is required of stewards that they be found faithful.”

I want to close with one of my favorite passages that uses Adonai, Psalm 8. The Complete Jewish Bible uses the Hebrew word for Lord, so it’s easy to see when it is used. Also note that the heading of the Psalm is included as a part of the text, verse 1, of the Psalm in this and other Jewish versions of the Bible.

For the leader. On the gittit. A psalm of David: Adonai! Our Lord! How glorious is your name throughout the earth! The fame of your majesty spreads even above the heavens! From the mouths of babies and infants at the breast you established strength because of your foes, in order that you might silence the enemy and the avenger. When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and stars that you set in place — what are mere mortals, that you concern yourself with them; humans, that you watch over them with such care? You made him but little lower than the angels, you crowned him with glory and honor, you had him rule what your hands made, you put everything under his feet — sheep and oxen, all of them, also the animals in the wilds, the birds in the air, the fish in the sea, whatever passes through the paths of the seas. Adonai! Our Lord! How glorious is your name throughout the earth!” Tehillim (Psa) 8:1-10

Adonai! Our Lord!

5 thoughts on “Adonai, our Lord and Master

  1. We were in the same situation ten years ago. Looking for a retirement village [over 55s] and finding nothing in the area where we had lived all of the 41 years we had been married, we looked closer to the town where our younger daughter and her family lived. Finally we thought we had found the right place. But as we were driving home, I had a very clear message in my head “That is NOT the right place for you to live.!” When I told John, and we discussed again the good and bad points of the place, we kept looking.

    While looking online one day I found an over-55s village in a town we had not considered, but in the area we were searching. We decided to have a look as online it seemed really good. When we visited the village it was as close to perfect as it could be. The homes were just what we wanted. No steps at all in the village – a big point as I have bad knees – and generally suiting our requiremnets. John had done all the finnacial checking and it was well within our budget.

    We were so impressed we paiid our deposit the same day and have lived here happily for just over 10 years. When anyone asks why we live in this particular town, all we can say, is that this is where God sent us. A big risk, as it is a rural town and my husband had never lived in the countyr before. I grew up in the country and feel as if I had come home. John has taken to rural living very well. We have never regretted trusting God that this is where we were to live.

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  2. We were looking back a few days ago at the first property we believed the Lord was leading us to buy. We learned that property wasn’t the Lord’s will for us when the original buyers of our house changed their mind just a few hours before the closing was scheduled. The owners of that property had to put their house back on the market, so that door was closed.

    Now that we have found the property that best meets our needs, we realize that first property we wanted to buy lacked several things, including a well-stocked pond which my husband now sees as a necessity, especially with the growing cost and limited availability of chicken, meat, and fish. God’s choice was better than ours!

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  3. As you discovered, and so did we, his choice is always not only better but best! The trouble is that we so often get disappointed when our choice falls through, whether it is a house, a job, or anything we have our heart set on. Sadly it takes many years and experiences to realise this.So often we giv elip service to trusting God but do not always live it 😦

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